10 Things You Must Consider before You Sign Your Appointment Letter

An appointment letter is a binding document that is issued after an applicant is given an offer letter. An appointment letter states the confirmation of a specific organization that a certain individual has been offered a position in the company and that he or she accepted it with a corresponding salary.

With regards to the confirmation of appointment, it is very important that you should read the letter carefully before you decide to sign. And if you get to write one, following specific guidelines and tips is very significant.

Appointment Letter Basics

Importance

The very significance of an appointment letter takes place when an employer asks a candidate to join the company for employment. It mainly concerns about an employee’s salary, benefits, compensations, confidentiality policies, work policies, starting date, description of the job positions, scopes of tasks to be done, etc.

Usage 

Appointment letters are mostly used by human resource personnel, specifically after providing job offer letters to potential employers. If you happen to be assigned in writing such document, it would be better to adhere the basic appointment letter format and sample appointment letter templates.

Execution 

When you are in the process of writing the appointment letter, the letterhead should be printed and be signed by the human resource manager. In the event that the candidate has accepted the company’s offer, the candidate has to sign the letter too to indicate acceptance of the offer.

Considerations before Signing Appointment Letters

An appointment letter is considered to be a critical binding document of a company and the potential employee, that’s why appointment letter formats are greatly advised in the process of writing such document. Below are the things you may want to consider before you sign one or go ahead and try free appointment letters for fast and easy reference.

  • Job Description and Position – you have to make sure that you are in the right position and the job description fits well to the job interview conducted.
  • Hours of  Work and Rest Days – you have to make sure that this is clearly stated in the letter. You don’t have to do long hours of work without being paid and not entitled to days off work.
  • Relocation Clause – there are some companies that require their employees to work in other locations, so this clause must also be specified in the letter.
  • Salary, Compensations, Benefits – make sure that these three are mentioned in the letter and they must be specific because some companies only mention base salaries without including other allowances and compensations.
  • Exclusivity – this portion answers to the question, “what would be the terms of secondary employment, if there would be any?”
  • Notice Period – check whether moving to the next company would be too long or too short in case you would want to move out.
  • Non-Disclosure Agreement – the most important part of the letter, you must have the full understanding as to what their expectations from you are.
  • Noncompete Clause – take account in checking whether the company asked you to not work with competitors after leaving their company. This is generally applicable to those specialized employees.
  • Company Financial Strength – you have to check whether the company adheres to a healthy and harmonious relationship toward their employers and what do they do to them when they lose customers. Do they fire and leave them or do they provide other alternatives?
  • Deductions – Certain deduction and the reasons for deducting must be stated in the letter.

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