How to Make a Thanksgiving Menu in Apple Pages

Good Housekeeping featured Aaron Allen and Associates’ infographics on the hidden psychology behind a menu’s structure. No longer is it merely a price list of food options, but it has become a scheme to persuade customers to order the food that the owners want them to. It includes the Golden Triangle, a strategic positioning where expensive items that are hoped to gain more popularity are placed at the center upper right corner and the upper left corner. This also makes use of color manipulation and put options in the middle of negative space because our attention is more drawn to spacious places.

To learn more tips on menu designing, follow the steps below:

1. Categorize

Don’t arrange your food menu in random order and selection. Categorize them according to meal types or food classifications. You can group the selection according to breakfast, lunch, snack, or dinner packages or divide them according to types such as main dishes, beverages, salads, and special combos. Your customers would find it easier to browse when the content is grouped accordingly, which would encourage them to take their options.

2. Use a Variety of Readable Fonts

While some graphic materials are restrictive with their typeface options, the menus are an exception. Depending on the theme and the tone you’re trying to set up on your layout, you can use multiple font styles. Your typography presents the air inside your establishment. An elegant menu with metallic scripts would not go well in a children’s cafe. Match your space’s atmosphere or impose the kind of environment you want to have through your menus. However, avoid using complicated and hard to read font styles and use bolder and bigger sizes as a highlight.

3. Be Creatively Descriptive

Using photos to do the job of presenting your food choices can work, but more often than not, it’s the source of your customer’s disappointment. Photos on the restaurant menu look more palatable, more vibrant, and bigger than the original, and your customers would expect to get the image right on their plates. Instead, use creative descriptions below your dish title. Hire a professional copywriter to do the job and employ alluring adjectives to capture your dish. When you do use pictures, employ professional photography, and avoid exaggerating the food subject.

4. Apply a Bit of Psychology

There are some psychological elements that you put into good use for a more efficient printable menu. These include the colors, placements, and the customer’s scanning patterns. If you have dishes that are less popular and are low in sales, place them directly below expensive selections. Customers who are looking for a cheaper option usually drop their gaze towards the items below the ones with a higher price tag. And when you put your price, avoid including the dollar signs as it impacts your customers negatively. Avoid also aligning the prices on one side together because it urges them to choose the cheapest. Place them with the description instead. Use colors that have a positive psychological effect such as orange (appetite stimulant), yellow (grabs attention), and green (presents healthy foods).

5. Employ Branding Designs

Don’t forget to whisk a part of your branding on your menu board. It should present your diner or restaurant’s identity. If you’re serving Mexican treats, use the country’s infamous patterns of red, blue, and red combos with the sombrero and guitar ensembles. If it serves an excellent dining experience, a classic and refined design with minimal content will look best. Don’t stray away from your branding. It’s crucial that your customers recognize you anywhere, and they won’t be able to do that if you’re visually inconsistent.

Read More