Ten Secrets to Make You Live Long in the Freelancing Ocean!

From the time you land on Google Search page to the time your browser hits on a freelancing website, the hope for success is always the only thing that happens to flow through to your veins. Every starting freelancer, even with the little bit of experience gained or no experience at all, knows that once they land the best deal, it could be a new journey as well as hope for financial stability and long-term job security. Hundreds of thousands of business opportunities online makes it possible even for newbies to choose whom to work for, when and how.

Living long in the freelancing ocean, however, requires business planning skills, high-class artistic potential and the ability to build long-term client to freelancer relationship. Let’s face it. Freelancing isn’t an easy job at all.

As an example, a professional writer may tell you straightforward that they create niche content for an array of clients and you think ooh, it is just about putting words on Microsoft Word Template and sending it across. You want to convince yourself that freelancing is a simple task because you need to think you can. However, true freelancing isn’t based on some delusional self-thoughts framed from the blues. It about getting real in the business otherwise you are out for good. Game over.

No freelancer wants to reach a dead end. We want to live long working online, and hope even beyond the little faith that can move mountains that we will indeed survive. With clients always looking for the best service, I am not promising that it is going to be easier. However, if you keep an eye and observe these ten secrets, I promise you will live long freelancing, perhaps until the end of time, if you choose.

> Don’t be a Money Freelancer

Earning is the main reason for the floods of freelancers online. The problem is that we often are so blinded with the money that we forget about a long-term contract and start making demands instead. This attitude has negative impact on workflow the major one being losing good clients to other service providers. Set your freelancing priorities right, and growing a long-term connection must never miss on your list of objectives.

> Never Curse the Low Rates

I have often read and heard freelancers talk ill about clients who offer low rates for given projects. The truth is that there is really no deal that is better than another is. My advice to you is simple. Never curse low rates. People who have been before you started there and emerged the most successful freelancers on the desks. The truth is, they still work on those rates and are thankful that they are.

> Die by Deadlines if you Have To

Missed deadlines equal to mad clients. You create deadlines and promise to deliver and then the deadline day the only thing your client sees is a gray light of you on their Google hangout. The consequences of missed deadlines are very grave and they include late payment and loss of future business. It is a big sin against Google, God and your client to miss deadlines. Bottom line is, always live and die by deadlines.

> Work Bit by Bit

It’s a bulk order! Okay, it sounds like a sweet deal, so why not take it. I tell you what, bulk orders are always quite tricky to handle, especially if you are a starter. Why not take a half or a fraction of the project! Working bit by bit sounds better, well, unless the deadline is a long one, which in most cases are highly unlikely.

> Communicate with Clients

Professional communication is critical. Practice emotional intelligence if you and your clients are mad on something. Always keep in touch so that the both of you can be together. Tell you what!  Regular communication makes both you and your client read from the same book form the onset of the contract.

> Build a Sub-Contracting Network

Living long in the freelancing ocean means many projects will be coming your way. Have you thought of creating a subcontracting network? If not, create your small business plan to help you do this. The main objective of a subcontracting team is to ensure that the work is done perfect, those deadlines are hit on the dot and that that every project goes according to plan.

> Stop Asking for Continuous Advance Payments

You have worked with a client for six months and are still asking for that upfront payment? There is a problem. Lack of trust of course. Soon, the client is going to get sick of this trend and search for some worthy person who is patient enough and never worries about payments. And when they do, believe me, you are definitely out of the field, forever perhaps.

> Be Ready for Revision

It is common for most freelancers not to revise projects because they need to think that the client is wrong.  It doesn’t pay to a snob or a nag. Those revisions are not going to take forever and believe me, they help so much because they determine whether clients can trust you with their future projects or not. To live long here, make those revisions, and even be ready to make further revisions should such need arise.

> Learn Even Further

Change with technology. If you are a writer, learn the current trends in content creation. If you are a programmer, know the current techniques of app building. If you are an SEO Analyst, learn the new working tips that will make you be a better you at what you do. Whatever you are, understand that practice is continuous, not a punishment as such.

> Never Compromise Quality

One mistake like compromising quality and you reach a personally caused dead end.  I have seen freelancers lose it all simply because they were quick to make money and forgot that quality is king. Put all your energy and focus all your attention on delivering quality and nothing but quality.


If you observe the above ten secrets, I promise you the internet will be a lovely place for you. Even if you ask the most successful freelancer in your area how they manage to stay long on the job, they will always tell you that the key to success is smart task, which is actually an observation of these characteristics.

by Irshad Shaik

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