What Is a Maintenance Schedule?

A maintenance schedule is widely defined as an important inspection, preventive, and repair program plan for keeping track of the daily, weekly, monthly, or yearly schedule of the maintenance done. A maintenance schedule is usually used by clients with offices, restaurants, buildings, or homes that need frequent maintenance work.

How to Create a Maintenance Schedule in Microsoft Word

When people are overwhelmed with certain tasks, they would either settle with low standards or not perform the task at all. As long as you know the basics and you have the resources and tools needed, you'll get the job done in no time. Instructions on how to create a professional schedule are provided below for your convenience, simply refer to it to keep yourself from being overwhelmed.

1. Start Establishing the People Involved

Before you start creating any maintenance schedule or procedure plan, it is a priority to establish the personnel who will be part of the preventive maintenance program. The likely options will include maintenance managers and people who deal with finance, but these options are not standard since the size of the area and the budget need to be considered. When looking for staff members, you must assess if these people are professional and will heavily invest in the project so the maintenance plan will be successful.

2. Determine the End Goal

Determining the project plan's expected outcome is just as important as knowing how to begin making it. Gather your staff and think of the possible goal that you all want to achieve when performing the task. Determining the end goal helps in keeping the maintenance plan stay on that path. For example, when dealing with homes, you might want to draft a goal to keep the rain from seeping through the roof and soak the house's interior. And if dealing with vehicles, your maintenance plan might also involve a maintenance checklist to inspect the condition of the engine and perform the needed repairs.

3. Check the Materials and Equipment

The next part of the plan is to create an inventory checklist of all the needed materials and equipment. Even if the task is already taking up a lot of time and is very tedious, checking the materials and equipment is still a critical part since it helps to ensure that things are done routinely. On a simple note, document the equipment's model, serial number, specifications, asset identification number, and its current condition.

4. Create Preventive Maintenance Procedures and Schedules

After a simple inventory list has been made, the next thing is to create a plan or assign tasks to do maintenance work on the equipment. When creating the schedule, be sure to address the different scenarios including the client, staff members, and condition of the equipment while also estimating the duration of the procedure. Since it's common for initial plans to turn out differently, make sure to already have an effective plan B to work things out.

5. Review and Revise the Procedure Plan

It's highly likely that errors and contradicting details find their way to your content, which is why it's very important to go over it at least once. Reviewing the plan and schedule will determine if certain details are incorrect or simply need to be revised to make it more comprehensible. Make it a habit to review and revise your work after writing it, this will ensure that your maintenance schedule is indeed worth reading.

Read More