What Is an IT Proposal?

When making business deals with another entity, such as that on the Internet and technology (IT) industry, and IT proposal is a document that bridges two different entities to work together in order to execute their innovative ideas in improving the business using the Internet and technology (e.g. websites, social media, etc.). In addition to contributing ideas, this also means to offer a solution to a problem as well as the course of actions to take like consulting to experts, conducting research proposal or thesis, etc.

When composing an IT proposal, technical writing and business writing are the building blocks of persuasive writing. Upon doing so, you wish to invite other business entities to work with you and to support your plans. Hence, an IT proposal is a document that joins two different entities to work together on a project or a program using the resources available in this digital era.

How to Write an IT Project Proposal

A proposal can help your IT business grow, so it's very important to attract as many prospective business partners as possible. For you to learn how to write an IT project proposal, read more below and follow these steps we have for you.

1. Define Your Audience

Before you begin writing your proposal, it is important that you know who your audience would be. Identify their level of familiarity, which means how much do they know about your products, services, and your business plan which will benefit both you and the other entity. Upon doing so, it's best to assume that they are busy, and reading in a rush. This way, you grant your ideas special considerations that give a "punch" on your proposal and entice them to work with you.

2. Introduce Your Business

Begin the draft of your sample letter by introducing your prospective business partner(s) to the products and/or services you are offering. Since we do not want to be partners with someone we do not know, how much more if we'd try to make business deals with an unreliable business entity. One of the best ways to attract prospects is to give them the "what's in it for me?" factor.

3. Present a Problem

Since a proposal aims to offer a solution to a problem and propose an idea on how to execute such solutions, therefore it's important to clearly explain and define the problem. Make sure you present it in a way that this might affect them as well—though not to scare them, but rather to invite them to contribute to a project that will improve your business as well as theirs. Aside from its effect on your prospect, also describe the degree and the factors of such arising problem(s). Aside from presenting the problem, make sure the issue has been clearly defined and it would be best to provide facts and figures; reports that perhaps came from a previous executive summary which indicates failure of executing the plan and/or solutions made—clearly a more persuasive proposal letter since it appears to be credible.

4. Present a Solution

After presenting the problem, here comes the part where your purpose of writing a proposal would be vividly justified. Here, you present your proposed solutions and the alternate ones in order to provide relevant options. Since a single action plan won't work, it's best to look for another alternative. In addition, make sure to provide what are costs for the course of action to be made. Most importantly, the benefits that you and your prospect will enjoy.

5. Organize Your Proposal

Finally, structure all these key points. Arrange these points accordingly in order to create a comprehensive, clear, and professional impression to your prospect. According to the book, Knowledge Into Action by Wallace and Van Fleet, a structured and tailored proposal will maximize its persuasive impact. Therefore, sort your points according to their relevance. You can begin by introducing your products and services or company overview, then define the issue, present your solution, then its benefits. You may also rearrange them according to your preference or the appropriateness.

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